how to move plants

How to Move Your Plants

Sometimes we don’t really think in advance about our plants and how they’re going to make the transition from one home to another. Our kids and our pets take more attention, and there’s so much to do before a move! What’s the big deal? We can just take the pot and go, right?

Actually, this is something you should be thinking about. Did you know that some plants can’t cross state lines? And how are you going to pack them securely so they get what they need and don’t spread dirt and mud all over the place? Plants are alive, and if you want to make sure they survive the move, you’ll need to know these tips on how to move your plants.



Check laws and climate conditions in your new home

If you’re moving to another state, you’ll have to follow laws about what can be brought into that state. For example, California has rules against bringing citrus plants, and only allows others in after quarantine conditions are met. Hawaii also has restrictions against certain flowers and trees; if you’re moving there, you’re entering an island ecosystem, which must be strictly protected from infestations.

Other states will have rules about invasive species, which are one of the major environmental problems of our time. You may also need an inspector to come out before you move, so you can get appropriate papers for your move.

Plan for how to move plants

Moving trucks aren’t the best places for plants. When they’re in there, they won’t have access to light, water, or air. As living beings, they need all three to survive. Many companies have rules against taking plants for just this reason.

For the best ways to move plants, you have three major options. First, you can leave them behind (except for a cutting for your new place), perhaps giving them to a friend or family member. Secondly, you can drive them to your destination, along with your family, pets, and valuable items. Or, you can ship them through FedEx or another reliable service.

Whichever way you choose, you’ll need to gather supplies to help your plants travel properly, and you’ll need to make sure to follow rules set out by the shipping companies. Do your research, and decide in advance the safest way to move your greenery.

Prepare how to travel with plants

Packing your plant properly is important for their well-being as you move them to a new home. You can take an entire plant, or just take a cutting that will allow you to grow a new plant in a new location. A cutting can easily be secured with wet paper towels, a rubber band, and a plastic stem holder (or a plastic pot in a box). Make sure they are the last thing you pack and the first thing you unpack when you’re traveling with plants.

First, check for insects. The last thing you want to do is take bugs into your new space. Not only could this be bad for your new house, you could be bringing an invasive pest species into your new state.

Secondly, re-pot your plants if possible into durable, light, plastic containers. Place a plastic bag over the entire pot and tie it, so soil doesn’t spill out. If you’re shipping, put the entire plant in a box with airholes. Any heavy, empty ceramic planters can go with the movers.

Finally, water your plants 2-3 days before moving so that roots are damp. Most types will be able to survive for a week without additional water.

If you’re shipping, label the box so shippers know there’s a fragile, live plant in there. If you’re moving your plants by car, don’t put them in the trunk, but do crack a window for air whenever you take a break from the road. Try to avoid exposing plants to cold or overly hot air. Bring them inside when you stop at overnight lodgings and only water them if needed.

Elite Moving & Storage wants to keep your plants safe and healthy as you move.

To that end, Elite Moving & Storage doesn’t ship plants ourselves, but we can offer you suggestions on how to do it yourself. Need to know how to move plants? Need advice on how to keep your entire household intact? Get an estimate from the best moving company in Chicago today!

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *